Find Therapists, Counselors and Psychologists in Denver, Colorado

Find a therapist in Denver, Colorado that meets your needs. Browse our comprehensive list of affordable and licensed therapists in Denver to find a professional specializing in counseling people with stress, anxiety, depression, relationship issues, grief and more.

Tiffany Pallas

Tiffany Pallas, LCSW, LAC, EMDR, Trained

Thank you for the opportunity to introduce myself. I am a licensed clinical social worker and licensed addictions counselor who has additional specialized training in integrated trauma treatment including an evidenced based practice called EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing). I have been working with and supporting adults and adolescents in individual and group therapy for the last 15 years. I have extensive experience, expertise and training in trauma-informed evidence based practices. Read More...
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  • Languages: English
  • Experience: 15 years


Dedra Chavis

Dedra Chavis, MA, LPC

Hello, I'm Dedra Chavis and I am a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) I hold a Master of Arts degree in Counseling with an emphasis on Mental Health. My work experience includes a broad range of issues, including anxiety, depression, stress management, family dynamics, self-esteem, health, and lifestyle. I also have a specialty in working with complex trauma. I am skilled in individual, family and group therapy, utilizing evidence and strength based treatment models including Read More...
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  • Languages: English
  • Experience: 13 years


Beth Deja

Beth Deja, LCSW

People come to therapy for a variety of reasons. Sometimes you are in crisis mode, and sometimes you just need someone to talk to for support. My goal is to help you manage distress, as well as help you determine where your issue comes from in the first place. Originally from Michigan, I gave up cold winters for the palm trees of sunny San Diego. I am empathetic, nonjudgmental, and authentic with a Read More...
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  • Languages: English
  • Experience: 10 years


Trista Sorenson

Trista Sorenson, MA, LPC

Hello! I am a Licensed Professional Counselor in Colorado. I have experience working mostly with adults. I have worked with clients with a wide range of concerns including depression, anxiety, bipolar, relationship issues, trauma, confidence and self-esteem and career challenges. I am committed to helping people through a method specific to their needs. I’m here to counsel, and counseling isn’t a “one size fits all” when you have a lot Read More...
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  • Languages: English
  • Experience: 7 years


Meghan Shoemaker

Meghan Shoemaker, LMFT

I am a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist in colorful Colorado. I have over 5 years of experience working with families, couples, and individuals of all ages. I was also an in-home intensive behavioral coach for a year and half focusing on maintaining children in their home whose families were involved with Child Protection. I have experience working with clients who are involved in the legal system, whether through probation or parole, around such topics Read More...
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  • Languages: English
  • Experience: 6 years


Carolyn Jones

Carolyn Jones, LPC, RN, CEDS, CEDRN

Hello! My name is Carolyn Jones and I have worked in the mental health field in Colorado for the past 27 years - both as a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) and a Registered Nurse (RN). I received my Bachelor's in Nursing in 1978 from the University of Nebraska and my Master's Degree in Counselor Education in 1994 from the University of Wyoming. I have had the opportunity to work with older adolescents and Read More...
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  • Languages: English
  • Experience: 27 years


Lea Ayer

Lea Ayer, MA, LPC

I am a Licensed Professional Counselor in Colorado and have been working in community mental health since 2015. I work closely with individuals who are currently going through major life changes (marriage, growing family, career changes, divorce, death, etc.). I also have experience in helping people struggling with grief and loss, chronic illness, facing terminal illnesses, or experiencing caregiver stress. I approach counseling by looking at all aspects of life; mind, body, environment, and Read More...
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  • Languages: English
  • Experience: 3 years


Julie Anderson

Julie Anderson, MA, LPC

I am glad you are here. A little bit about myself- I have 8 years of direct clinical experience with people with a variety of needs and from a variety of backgrounds. I received my Master's in Mental Health Counseling from University of Pennsylvania and I am a Licensed Professional Counselor through the state of Colorado. I am trained in CBT (Cognitive Behavioral Therapy), DBT (Dialectical Behavioral Therapy) and EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitization and Read More...
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  • Languages: English
  • Experience: 8 years


Karri Nelson

Karri Nelson, LCSW

Hi, my name is Karri Nelson and I am currently a Licensed Clinical Social Worker in the state of Colorado with over 13 years of behavioral health and human services experience. I received my Bachelors degree in Psychology in 2006 from Lock Haven University of Pennsylvania. After graduating with my undergraduate degree, I worked in Children Protective Services, foster care and adoption, case management, and crisis management services. While working full time, I began pursuing Read More...
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  • Languages: English
  • Experience: 7 years


Steve Garufi

Steve Garufi, MA, LPC

With 15 years of experience, my areas of interest include depression, anxiety, self-image, healing from trauma and abuse, divorce recovery, overcoming shame, life transitional issues, matters of loneliness, and empowering others to pursue their dreams and career aspirations. I earned my B.A. in Political Science at Montclair State University in New Jersey in 1994 and gained my Masters in Counseling at Denver Seminary in 2002. I've been a Licensed Professional Counselor (#4201) in Colorado since Read More...
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  • Languages: English
  • Experience: 16 years


An Overview of Mental Health in Denver, Colorado

Denver, Colorado–known for its breathtaking landscape views and a number of natural parks from which to savor them–is considered the third best place to live in the United States, based on metrics concerning career prospects, quality of life, and government census data. With clear, moderately sunny weather and a municipal ambition to  establish depression-stifling park spaces within a 10-minute walk from all residents, it is unsurprising that the city has consistently ranked as a desirable region for families to establish their lives. However, lending credibility to the idea that factors related to financial wellness and typically perceived indicators of high life quality do not necessarily equate to happiness, Denver does not maintain this impressive ranking in terms of emotional wellness.

The State of Mental Wellness in Denver

A 2018 WalletHub study that drew upon data concerning depression rates and other factors scientifically linked to happiness ranked Denver 32 in emotional and physical wellness out of 180 American cities. Some expert opinions predict that depression will become the second leading cause of disability in the world in the upcoming years, and Denver’s depression and suicide rates give credence to this prediction. The state has carried a high suicide rate over the past decade and struggled to address its high depression prevalence through government efforts with subjective degrees of success. A 2018 publication considering both federal data on Colorado behavioral health and regional resources estimated that anywhere from 7-17% of Colorado residents suffer from depression with woman and minority demographics  likely experiencing the condition at a higher rate.

Increased rates of mental illness in Denver minority communities parallels national trends and may partially root from higher poverty rates among minority households in Denver County. 14% of Denver lives at or below the federal threshold for poverty, and about one-third of Latino and African-American children live in poverty, reflecting racial disparity in income that may reflect overall patterns in the region. Furthermore, Denver females aged 18-44, (an age range associated with high suicide rates in Denver),experience higher levels of poverty. A recent study suggests that poverty in Denver, which has typically been concentrated in its most urban, densely packed neighborhoods,is slowly permeating Denver County’s suburbs, taking with it the mental hardships associated with financial hardship.

The delicate physiology of developing brains makes teenagers particularly susceptible to depressive disorders, and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services reported that approximately 12% of Colorado adolescents reported experiencing a major depressive episode within the last year, a percentage point above the national average. In Denver, approximately 7% of adolescents have been formally diagnosed with depressive disorders. Though these rates do not notably differ from national averages, Colorado’s completed suicide rate is significantly higher than other states. According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), Colorado has the 9th highest suicide rate  in the country, with approximately 20 deaths for every 100,000 residents. These rates in Colorado have been steadily increasing since 2009, with 2016 seeing 1,156 deaths due to suicide, and though suicide is the third leading cause of death among younger age groups nationwide, it is the number one cause of death for similar demographics in Colorado. Denver County itself, however, appears to contribute far less to this these statistics than counties south and west of it.

Mental Health Treatments Availability in Denver

The Colorado Department of Health shows a high concentration of mental care facilities in the Denver metropolitan area relative to the state as a whole, but an overall shortage and lack of access to quality health insurance prevents many from accessing the care they need.Approximately 30% of Coloradans–over 1 million people–require mental health and substance abuse services, yet only 15   psychiatrists are available for every 100,000 residents.This reflects progress since 2003, which saw the state’s mental health needs met by only 10,564 providers.This number climbed to 14,217 by 2011, and continues to do so, yet the region still struggles to meet its mental health needs in the face of rising opioid use and cultural acknowledgement of mental disorders. For those with severe mental difficulties, the circumstances are dire. As psychiatric conditions are typically viewed as less pressing through a traditional medical lens, hospitals in Colorado spend less resources to accommodate those with mental illnesses. One of Colorado’s primary hospitals, University Hospital, closed its psychiatric unit several years ago, although 10% of patients arriving to its emergency room were admitted on grounds of mental illness. However, the health department’s site lists three government-affiliated mental health community centers in Denver, (Charg Resource Center, the Mental Health Center of Denver, and Servicios De La Raza), but a total of 17 can be found throughout the city. The last of these is Denver’s largest state-funded facility, featuring an emergency walk-in crisis center that served over 4,000 patients with urgent needs in 2017.

Local nonprofits seek to bolster the city’s efforts in furthering their options for mental health treatment. The newly opened Steven A. Cohen Military Family Clinic provides specialized services for veterans and their families, while the Colorado Coalition for the  Homeless has long sought to address disproportionate inadequacies in mental treatment for the city’s increasing homeless population. As there are over 30,000 veterans residing in Denver County and at least 5,116 homeless individuals in the region, such organizations help minimize a crucial need in populations with more unique needs.

Connect with Quality Professionals In Denver

The psychiatric health worker shortage in Denver has resulted  in long wait times for those seeking professional opinions and counseling from therapists, wait times that often leave residents waiting months before they see a therapist apropos to their condition. E-Counseling helps link Denver County residents with trained professionals to help them better understand their issues and providing guidance, allowing you to make educated decisions in restoring your mental well-being.