Greenville, North Carolina Therapists

Find a therapist in Greenville, North Carolina that meets your needs. Browse our comprehensive list of affordable and licensed therapists in Greenville , to find a professional specializing in counseling people with stress, anxiety, depression, relationship issues, grief and more.

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In-Person Sessions:

Columbus, Georgia

Teletherapy for Clients In:

Georgia, North Carolina

EMDR and Brainspotting are evidence based therapeutic modalities proven effective in managing the effects of traumatic events, including grief. Trauma can be a single event (ie sexual assault) or complex, accumulated from years of stressful...
In-Person Sessions:

Raleigh, North Carolina

Teletherapy for Clients In:

North Carolina

I offer you over 18 years of experience working with women, couples, children, and families. Upon meeting me, you will find someone who is non-judgmental and empathetic. I specialize in using an eclectic mix of solution-focused,...
Anne Moss
Ed.D., MA
Teletherapy for Clients In:

Georgia, North Carolina

Hello! I am a licensed professional counselor who would like to help you achieve meaningful change, find balance, and feel better. I work with adults and adolescents who may be facing challenging situations regarding relationships, social issues,...
In-Person Sessions:

Raleigh, North Carolina

Teletherapy for Clients In:

North Carolina

Thank you for being here! I want to acknowledge that looking for help can be hard as it can be the first step of a healing process and seeking out help can sometimes provoke a sense of fear or anxiety. I work with individuals experiencing various...
Teletherapy for Clients In:

North Carolina

We are mental health providers that are either Registered Play Therapists (RPT) or training to become RPTs. We have specialized education, training and clinical supervision specific to Play Therapy. We believe in the healing powers of play and in...
Natalie Huston
LPC, NCC
In-Person Sessions:

Charlotte, North Carolina

Are you looking to be restored from trauma or difficult life experiences? Are you looking for more whole or meaningful relationship with self, God/Higher Power, or others? Have you been hurt, broken, or feel weary from emotional pain and you long...
Teletherapy for Clients In:

North Carolina

I believe it is my job to come alongside you in your journey, to be supportive of the goals you have but also to respectfully challenge you at times. When you need to be challenged, you will be encouraged to take steps that you may have never...
Teletherapy for Clients In:

North Carolina

I am a licensed clinical social worker (LCSW) providing counseling in Sanford North Carolina. I received my Master of Social Work (MSW) degree in 2001 at the University of Maryland in Baltimore. I have completed the required two years of postmasters...
In-Person Sessions:

Raleigh, North Carolina

Teletherapy for Clients In:

North Carolina

Addressing challenges in our personal life is not easy. While a common reaction to difficulties and challenges is to attempt to avoid them, it seldom solves the problem. Friends can help with some struggles in life, while other challenges need...
Mary Lee
LMHC
In-Person Sessions:

Charlotte, North Carolina

Teletherapy for Clients In:

North Carolina

Mary Lee is currently providing therapy services at Center for Emotional Health of Steele Creek, NC. CEH provides outpatient psychiatry services that include: Medication Management, Outpatient Counseling/Therapy, Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation...
Liana Nelson
LMHC, L.P.C, MS
Teletherapy for Clients In:

North Carolina, Missouri

Is sex a difficult subject and the thought of sex and intimacy sends you on an emotional rollercoaster? Do you find yourself guarded and struggling to connect and commit even with yourself? Avoidance is no longer working and it seems impossible to...
In-Person Sessions:

Cary, North Carolina

Dr. Wynns, the owner and founder of Wynns Family Psychology, is frequently sought out as local expert on child psychology and parenting issues for radio shows, t.v. news, magazines like Carolina Parent, and t.v. shows like My Carolina Today. She was...
Teletherapy for Clients In:

North Carolina

Relationships, trauma, health issues, life transitions, grief, family dynamics, and childhood wounds can keep us feeling stuck. Nothing is more important to the therapeutic experience than the relationship between client and therapist. My goal is to...
Lillian Hood
MA, LPA, LCAS
Teletherapy for Clients In:

North Carolina

You feel stuck. You can’t do all of the things you want to do. Maybe you’re haunted by the past and troubled by the ongoing effects of it. It’s hard to be around others, especially crowds or in situations that you can’t control. You find...
Jen Johnson
LMHC, MS
Teletherapy for Clients In:

North Carolina

I am a mindfulness teacher, coach, and therapist offering an integrative approach to mind body healing. I teach people how to regulate the nervous system and cultivate a calm body, open heart, and steady mind. I teach you how to manage difficult...
In-Person Sessions:

Charlotte, North Carolina

Teletherapy for Clients In:

North Carolina

I am a Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor Associate in North Carolina. I graduated from Appalachian State University with a Bachelor of Science in Psychology and received my Master of Science in Mental Health Counseling from Capella...
In-Person Sessions:

Greensboro, North Carolina

Teletherapy for Clients In:

North Carolina

I do my best work helping people through life transitions. Navigating through changes while maintaining our values is our biggest challenge. I can help by being a catalyst and supporter.
Teletherapy for Clients In:

North Carolina

I am a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist in North Carolina and a Licensed Clinical Addiction Specialist- Associate. I graduated from the University of Mississippi with a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology and received a Master's degree in Marriage...
Sarah Gates
MA, LPA
In-Person Sessions:

Greensboro, North Carolina

Teletherapy for Clients In:

North Carolina

Sarah sees children, adolescents, and families. She is a Licensed Psychological Associate who provides therapy and psychological evaluation services to children and adolescents individually and within the context of the family. She also completes...
In-Person Sessions:

Burnsville, North Carolina

Teletherapy for Clients In:

North Carolina

Angela is a licensed therapist who creates a warm, gentle, and genuine therapeutic presence where clients can navigate life’s challenges and changes across the lifespan. She specializes in supporting adolescents, teens, and adults who struggle...
In-Person Sessions:

Mint Hill, North Carolina

Teletherapy for Clients In:

North Carolina

I unreservedly believe in the resiliency of the human spirit, and I have personally seen clients move from merely surviving to thriving. I am committed to offering a safe place in a non-judgmental setting where you can discover your own strengths...
In-Person Sessions:

Winston Salem, North Carolina

Teletherapy for Clients In:

North Carolina

Leslie Travia is currently providing therapy services at Center for Emotional Health of Winston Salem. CEH provides outpatient psychiatry services that include: Medication Management, Outpatient Counseling/Therapy, Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation...
Teletherapy for Clients In:

North Carolina

Gina is a Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor and a Licensed Clinical Addiction Specialist. She obtained her Bachelor’s degree from California State University of Long Beach in English Education. She holds her Master’s of Arts degree from...
Brooke Musick
L.P.C, LCAS
Teletherapy for Clients In:

North Carolina

I completed my Undergraduate degree at the University of Wilmington in 2005 with a Bachelor of Science in Biology, premedical sciences. I completed my Graduate degrees in Rehabilitation Counseling at East Carolina University in 2009; one in...

An Overview of Mental Health in Greenville, North Carolina

As a gateway city to the eastern-third of North Carolina, Greenville is a fairly populated city with approximately 91,500 residents. As of right now, Greenville’s economy, which relies heavily on agriculture and trade, is in decline, which experts attribute partially to the cutbacks in the tobacco industry. However, because of the assortment of pharmaceuticals, material handling equipment and other manufacturing in the area, economists anticipate that job growth in the eastern part of NC will be among the highest in the state come the next census.

Until that happens, however, statistics remain dismal in the Greenville area. The estimated median household income in Greenville in 2016 was $36,806, nearly $15,000 lower than the state’s estimated median of $50,584. The estimate median per capita income in Greenville in 2016 was $24,887, roughly a third of the nation’s median of $60,200.

The poverty rate in Greenville is 32 percent. That is 14 percent greater than the national poverty rate. The homeownership rate is slightly higher, at 54.4 percent.

Poverty in and of itself is a leading indicator of mental health issues. The above stats, along with other indicators, suggest that mental health should be a concern for Greenville and the entire state of North Carolina. Additional data proves that it is.

The State of Mental Health in North Carolina

Mental health is a widespread issue that spans the entire U.S. North Carolina, however, is having a particularly hard time combatting mental health disorders.

  • In 2014, approximately one in five adults in North Carolina had a diagnosable behavioral, mental or emotional disorder.
  • One in 12 adults were dependent on alcohol or illegal drugs during that same year.
  • The current suicide rate in North Carolina is 13 per 100,000 individuals, which is on par with the national suicide rate, but higher than it was when the state created mental health objectives in 2008.
  • The average number of poor mental health dates among working adult residents is 3.8 per 100,000 individuals which is, again, higher than it was in 2008.

Risk Factors for Mental Illness in Greenville

What makes Greenville residents more susceptible to mental health problems than residents of other states or cities? Income aside, there are a few challenges specific to the eastern portion of North Carolina. Those include the following:

  • Poor Health: In 2011, 64 percent of eastern North Carolina adults reported that they were overweight or obese, nearly 39 percent had high blood pressure, and more than 40 percent had high cholesterol. 11.7 percent of adults were living with diabetes. Poor health is an aggravating factor for stress, depression and other mental disorders.
  • Sexually Transmitted Disease: From 2011 to 2013 Pitt County, was ranked as having the ninth highest rate of HIV in the state, and seventh highest rate of AIDS. Gonorrhea rates in the county were two times higher than the state’s rates. STDs can lead to depression, stress and anxiety.
  • Homeownership Rates: The homeownership rate in Greenville is 54.4 percent, significantly lower than the national rate. Lack of homeownership brings with it instability and anxiety regarding the future.
  • Infant Mortality: The infant mortality rates in Greenville are shockingly high, at 9.9 deaths per 1,000 live births, compared to the national infant mortality rate of 5.9. Losing a baby can trigger intense grief, depression, anger and other emotional responses.
  • Teen Pregnancy: The teen pregnancy rate in Pitt County in 2013 was 29.8 per 1,000 girls aged 15 to 19. The national rate is 22.3. Teen pregnancy can result in poverty, depression, lack of education and minimal job prospects.
  • Culture: Approximately 50 percent of Greenville’s population is non-white. More minorities tend to go without adequate mental health care than whites.

Availability of Mental Health Resources in Greenville

Despite the prevalence of both mental health risk factors and obvious signs of mental health-related issues, and despite efforts at both the state and federal levels to correct the issue, North Carolina’s mental health crisis is only getting worse. The reason for the crisis is simple: Since 1955, North Carolina has drastically reduced and misused its mental health resources. As a result, North Carolina residents have nowhere to turn when they need help.