Find Therapists and Counselors in Corvallis, Oregon

Find a therapist in Corvallis, Oregon that meets your needs. Browse our comprehensive list of affordable and licensed therapists in Corvallis, to find a professional specializing in counseling people with stress, anxiety, depression, relationship issues, grief and more.

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MA, LPC INTERN
Areas of Expertise
  • Abuse & Domestic Violence
  • Coping with Life Transitions
  • Family Conflicts
  • Gender Identity
  • Trauma
Areas of Expertise
  • Anxiety and Stress
  • Coping with Life Transitions
  • Depression
  • Marriage and Relationships
  • Mood Disorders
LPC 172, MA
Areas of Expertise
  • Anxiety and Stress
  • Attachment & Codependency
  • Mood Disorders
  • PTSD
  • Trauma
MA, MFT Intern
Areas of Expertise
  • Anxiety and Stress
  • Family Conflicts
  • Intimacy Related Issues
  • Marriage and Relationships
  • Mood Disorders
NCC, MA, LPC-I
Areas of Expertise
  • Chronic Illness & Medical Issues
  • Depression
  • PTSD
  • Trauma
LMHC, LPC 172
Areas of Expertise
  • Coping with Life Transitions
  • Trauma
Areas of Expertise
  • Anxiety and Stress
  • Coping with Life Transitions
  • Depression
  • Marriage and Relationships
Areas of Expertise
  • Coping with Life Transitions
  • Emotional Disturbance
  • Mood Disorders
  • Self Esteem
LPC 172
Areas of Expertise
  • Attachment & Codependency
  • Coping with Life Transitions
  • Marriage and Relationships
  • Spiritual Struggles
MA, QMHP, NBCC
Areas of Expertise
  • Anxiety and Stress
  • Cultural Issues & Trauma
  • Depression
  • Grief
  • Suicide Ideation
Areas of Expertise
  • Addictions
  • Coping with Life Transitions
  • Depression
  • Infertility
  • Marriage and Relationships
LMFT, MS
Areas of Expertise
  • Anxiety and Stress
  • Compassion Fatigue
  • Coping with Life Transitions
  • Eating Disorders
  • Intimacy Related Issues
MS, CRC, LPC Intern
Areas of Expertise
  • Anxiety and Stress
  • Compassion Fatigue
  • Chronic Illness & Medical Issues
  • Coping with Life Transitions
  • Grief

An Overview of Mental Health in Corvallis, Oregon

From living with a severe mental illness such as depression and schizophrenia to struggling with relationship issues or addiction, people can easily become overwhelmed and not know where to turn to when life becomes difficult. For people living in Corvallis, Oregon, there is hope to be found. There are several therapists in the area available to help residents with their mental health concerns by analyzing the individual’s situation, giving them the chance to express their feelings, and offering helpful solutions.

About Corvallis, Oregon

Corvallis, Oregon is the county seat of Benton County and has an estimated population of 58,641 as of 2018. The city has seen substantial growth over the last few years with a 7.6 percent increase from 2010 to 2018. Corvallis is home to Oregon State University, which had an enrollment of 32,011 students in the fall of 2018. The city is also recognized as a Tree City and contains close to 50 public parks.

The racial makeup of Corvallis includes 83.7 percent white, 9.2 percent Asian, 7.9 percent Hispanic, and 1.1 percent African American residents.  12.9 percent of people living in the city are foreign-born and 17 percent speak a language other than English at home. The mean travel time to work for workers is only 16.9 minutes, which is less than the state average of 22.5 minutes. The median household income in Corvallis is $46,285, and the poverty rate is 27.3 percent. 96.4 percent of people over the age of 25 have at least a high school degree and 60.1 percent have a bachelor’s degree or higher.

Mental Health Concerns in Corvallis, Oregon

When examining the mental health situation in Corvallis, Oregon, is important to consider how being a university town effects the city. For one, the high poverty rate is connected closely to the community’s status as a college town. In some cities, students who live off-campus can increase the overall poverty rate by as much as ten percent. When examining college students and poverty levels around the country, approximately 51.8 percent of students living away from relatives off-campus are below the poverty line.

Poverty has a very negative effect on the mental health of both children and adults and some data from a survey taken in poorer communities reveal an increased prevalence of mental health issues. Since so many college students struggle to make ends meet, they are having to work long hours in addition to taking classes. This can affect the individual’s ability to perform well in school and even lead to dropping out.

In general, mental health is a growing concern among college students. Approximately one-third of college students claim to have been depressed in a given year and one study by the APA revealed that around 86 percent of students with a psychiatric disability dropped out of college.

Suicide is currently the second leading cause of death among college students nationally. The state of Oregon has a higher than average suicide rate and in Benton County the suicide rate was 13 per 100,000 people from the years 2011 to 2015. Drug and alcohol abuse is also an issue for the community with 17.4 hospitalizations and 6.6 overdose deaths for every 100,000 people in the area.

Mental Health Resources in Corvallis, Oregon

Once an individual with a mental health concern decides they are ready to seek help, finding a therapist or other resources can be difficult. Approximately 60.2 percent of adults living with a mental illness in Oregon went untreated in the past year. Fortunately, Oregon ranks second in the country for having a high rate of mental health providers in the area. There is one provider for every 210 people living in the state.

For students experiencing mental health issues, Oregon State University offers short-term counseling services and has a campus suicide hotline number: 541-737-2131. Anyone else struggling with thoughts of suicide should call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255). For anyone who needs medical attention or immediate help, they should visit the Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center or call the police at 9-1-1.

Once the immediate, emergent needs are taken care of, then long-term goals can be made. For those with mental illness, the road to a happy life is finished one step at a time and it’s important for family and friends to support them along the way.